NRICH MATHS PROBLEM SOLVING KS1

Try continuing these patterns made from triangles. In this problem it is not the squares that jump, you do the jumping! Lots of Lollies Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level: One of Thirty-six Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level: Dicey Addition Age 5 to 11 Challenge Level: How quickly can you put back the numbers on the hundred square?

Can you use the information given to find out how many eggs are in each basket? What can’t you make? Two Dice Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level: Teddy Town Age 5 to 14 Challenge Level: A hundred square has been printed on both sides of a piece of paper.

Two Spinners Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level: How could you sort the cards?

Problem Solving :

To support this aim, members of the NRICH team work in a wide range of capacities, including providing professional development for teachers wishing to embed rich mathematical tasks into everyday classroom practice.

Inside Triangles Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level: Next Domino Age mrich to 7 Challenge Level: Finding All Possibilities Lower Primary These activities focus on finding all possible solutions so nricy in a systematic way will ensure none are left out.

On a farm there were some hens and sheep. Even and Odd Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level: Hidden Jewels Age 3 solvibg 5 Saying how many there are without counting. Robot Monsters Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level: Counting and Ordering KS1.

  DISSERTATION AU PROBATOIRE SENEGAL

Maisy Goes Camping Age 3 to 5 Using everyday language to talk about addition and subtraction. What would the solution be in each case?

Problem Solving

What different shapes do they make if each part lies in the small squares of a 4 by 4 square? Can you work out where their counters will land? Scroll down to see our complete collection of KS1 problems that require children to marhs systematically, or explore the two sub-collections focusing on important aspects of systematic working.

nrich maths problem solving ks1

He could then pay any sum of money from 1p to 15p without opening any solviing. What could the half time scores have been in these Olympic hockey matches?

They decided to have a swimming race, a running race, a high jump and a long jump. This problem is designed to help children to learn, and to use, the two and three times tables. The fourth article builds on the third by discussing what we mean by problem-solving skills and how NRICH can help children develop these skills. If you know the numbers that come out, what addition might be going on in the box?

Multiplication and Division KS1

The sum of each side of the triangle should equal the number in mths centre. Are You Well Balanced? What’s in a Name? Frances and Rishi were given a bag of lollies. Can you find a way to do it? Use the interactivity to help get a feel for this problem and to find out all the possible ways the balls could land.

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Working Systematically at KS1 :

Patterns and Sequences KS1. There are three baskets, a brown one, a red one and nrlch pink one, holding a total of 10 eggs. Are these statements relating to odd and even numbers always true, sometimes true or never true? To support this aim, members of the NRICH team work in a wide range of capacities, including providing professional development for teachers wishing to embed rich mathematical tasks into everyday classroom practice.

In how many different ways can they build their houses? In this town, houses are built with one room for each person. Estimating, Comparing, Measuring KS1. What Was in the Box?

nrich maths problem solving ks1

Counting in ones and twos.