Archive for November, 2013

A guide to street photography: Matt Stuart, manners and human autofocus

Street photography is the purest, most spontaneous way to create art with a camera.

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Andy Warhol pop-up booked for SF Mulberry store

Andy Warhol, "Santa Claus," 1981, unique polaroid printA week-long open exhibition of Andy Warhol's Christmas-themed work is to appear at the San Francisco store of leather fashion house Mulberry, in conjunction with auction house Christie's. Photographs, prints, and paper-based works are due to be displayed during the December 13-19 short run exhibit, some of which works date from Warhol's time in commercial illustration during the 1950s. It's the fifth in a series of collaborations between the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and Christie's, which has seen both live and online auctions accompany similar local exhibitions.


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Nintendo releases 3D guide to the Louvre

Video screenshot: Shigeru Miyamoto (L) and Satoru Iwata (R) next to the Mona LisaOriginally conceived as a location guide to the world's most visited museum, Nintendo's 3DS Guide to the Louvre is now available for download.


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Four cheers for our city

City tourism leaders have long urged visitors to spend longer in Auckland before they head off to the traditional tourist fields of Rotorua, Bay of Islands or Queenstown.

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Masked artist makes sticky issue out of radiation in Japan

People walk past a sticker art made by an artist known as 281 Antinuke, designed in the likeness of Japan's Prime Minister Abe, along a street in TokyoBy Sophie Knight TOKYO (Reuters) – With his face hidden behind sunglasses and a white surgical mask, the artist is almost as invisible as the radioactive contamination he is protesting against – yet his stickers are graphic reminders of the Fukushima nuclear disaster. Known as 281 Antinuke, Japan's answer to Banksy has covered Tokyo streets in images depicting politicians as vampires and children being shielded from radioactive rain to highlight the consequences of a meltdown at the Fukushima nuclear plant after an earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. The disaster and the response by plant operator Tokyo Electric Power Co (Tepco) stoked anti-nuclear sentiment and the biggest public protests in Japan since the 1960s, but the movement has since lost momentum. "Perhaps because everyone believes people telling them on television that everything is fine, they don't seem so worried," 281 Antinuke told Reuters.


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